Sashimi

Dining Experience

Quality Ingredients for Quality Dishes

Considered a delicacy across the globe, sashimi is a type of thinly sliced raw seafood. Traditionally served in Japan as an appetizer, sashimi is usually placed on top of shredded white radish and is often served with soy sauce, wasabi, and ginger.

To qualify for raw consumption, seafood has to be sushi grade (or in this case sashimi grade). There are general guidelines about what constitutes sashimi grade seafood. These often incorporate food safety requirements and outline characteristics of fresh seafood, including appearance, odour, colour and taste. 

One way to identify fresh seafood is by using the Quality Index Method that utilizes a quality index demerit score. Some quality parameters in this system include clarity of the fish’s eyes, smell of the gills, and firmness of the belly. These are then assigned between 0 to 3 demerit points, with 0 being fresh and 3 being rancid. The points are then added up to achieve an overall score, with larger numbers indicative of fish deterioration. 

We select our seafood based on this criteria, where we choose only the freshest ingredients to serve. Sourcing quality ingredients is one of our top priorities here at Tsukiji so we hope this addresses any potential concerns!

Kinmedai

Yubiki style sashimi (rinse with boiling water on skin), tataki appetizer (rolled with onion, radish sprouts inside, served in yuzu pepper sauce). It has a light flavour and slightly crispy texture.

Uni (Sea Urchin)
うに刺身

It has a big strong flavour that sometimes comes with a minor bitterness. It's a seasonal ingredient that can be found locally most of the time. Another type imported from Japan Hokkaido, called Bafun Uni, is much smaller in size but always comes with a sweet pleasant flavour.

Bluefin Akami
(Tuna Belly - no fat)
It is the most popular type of tuna that can weigh over 500 lbs. We only use the belly part closest to its chin (Kamatoro), which carries the most even fat and richest flavour. It separates into 3 parts: Otoro (very fatty, melts in mouth), Chutoro (medium fat, great flavour and texture), Akami (regular tuna with no fat, ruby red colour, unique texture).
Madai
Sashimi, usuzukui (ultra thin cut), tataki appetizer. It has a very light and refreshing flavour with a little bit of sweetness and a strong crispy texture.
Bluefin Chutoro
(Tuna Belly - medium fat)

It is the most popular type of tuna that can weigh over 500 lbs. We only use the belly part closest to its chin (Kamatoro), which carries the most even fat and richest flavour. It separates into 3 parts: Otoro (very fatty, melts in mouth), Chutoro (medium fat, great flavour and texture), Akami (regular tuna with no fat, ruby red colour, unique texture).

Shima Aji

Sashimi, tataki appetizer (rolled with onion and radish sprouts inside, served in yuzu pepper sauce). It has a unique flavour with a strong firm texture.

Hotate (Scallop)
帆立
These are fresh Hokkaido scallops. Aburi and nigiri sushi is a popular way to serve it, seasoned with lime juice and zest.
Bluefin Otoro
(Tuna Belly - very fatty)

It is the most popular type of tuna that can weigh over 500 lbs. We only use the belly part closest to its chin (Kamatoro), which carries the most even fat and richest flavour. It separates into 3 parts: Otoro (very fatty, melts in mouth), Chutoro (medium fat, great flavour and texture), Akami (regular tuna with no fat, ruby red colour, unique texture).

Hata (Grouper)

It is a highly prized fish and rare menu item that is known for its mildly sweet flavour and firm texture. One of the few grouper species, the scamp, is highly sought after for its high quality of meat. Peak of flavour for these delicacies is June through August.

Kanpachi
Kanpachi (Greater Amberjack)
It refers to a very young yellowtail from the Amberjack family. The belly of the Kanpachi is the fattiest portion of the fish and its flesh is tender but firm to the bite with little trace of fishiness at all.

Dining Experience

Sashimi Preparations & Eating Etiquettes

While traditional sashimi is served as an appetizer, today it is also often offered as a main dish or as a combo. Sashimi usually comes immaculately presented with squid and white fish in the centre of the plate, while positioning the red fish, such as tuna and salmon, around it. While the intricate arrangement has a lot to do with presentation, it also hints at the order that sashimi should be eaten. To get the most out of the experience, start your meal with the subtle-flavoured white fish before moving to the stronger-flavoured red fish.

There is a special etiquette for eating sashimi in Japan. Here are the steps to follow:

1 Place a small amount of wasabi on the sashimi to enhance its flavour. Never mix wasabi directly with the soy sauce.
2Dip the sashimi in the soy sauce without soaking it. Too much soy sauce can overpower the taste of the sashimi.
3Place the entire piece of sashimi in your mouth. Never bite it in half.
4Eat ginger between bites to cleanse your palate.
5Feel free to eat the vegetables on your plate. They are great for digestion, especially when it comes to oily fishes like tuna and salmon.

While you don’t necessarily have to follow all these rules when you’re eating at our restaurant, some tips like eating ginger in between bites of different seafood will definitely enhance your dining experience. 

Cart
  • No products in the cart.
About
Aburi & Nigiri
Aburi & Nigiri
Wagyu Beef
Contact
Order Online